Art Deco-Inspired Wedding Invitations

Art Deco Wedding Invitations via Happy Hands Project

I became an instant fan of the classic 1920’s look because of this art deco themed invite suite I had the privilege of designing. It was a vintage theme, yes, but the beautiful thing is, it doesn’t look ‘old’ at all. It’s just pure class, and I truly enjoyed the whole design process.

Art Deco Wedding Invitations via Happy Hands Project

The suite is a mix of handwritten elements and digital design, and searching for the perfect art deco font proved to be a challenge. A self-proclaimed font snob, I found myself browsing through fonts that were too mediocre to use. I finally found one or two that would suit the design excellently. Paired with the classic art deco pattern and modern calligraphy, the printed suite came out so much prettier than what I saw on my laptop screen. The colours came out soft and pleasing to the eye — exactly how I wanted it to be.

Photos courtesy of Nelwyn Uy Photography
Wedding coordintation by the 3rd Party Wedding Planners

5 Premium Brush Fonts Worth Checking Out

 

5-Brush-Lettering-Fonts-via-Happy-Hands-Project

Am I the only one hooked on brush lettering fonts? Everytime I click on Creative Market, there is a vast number of brush fonts for sale. For those who find lettering with a brush a bit challenging, one can always invest in a font or two to make artworks.

After pointed pen calligraphy, I also love lettering with a brush and trying out different styles can be tricky. For the beginner, looking at the structure and letter forms of these fonts can help one understand how these are written. These fonts are so natural-looking and you can even see the strokes on the letters. Talk about organic!

Wish I could give away a font that I have designed myself. But while I figure out how that dream will come to fruition, let me share with you my favourite premium brush fonts so far:

Bonjour by Nicky Laatz
Botanica Script by My Creative Land
Heartwell Italic by Flavor Type
Manhattan Darling by Make Media Co.
Smitten by Make Media Co.

Enjoy!

The Happy Hour Modern Calligraphy Workshop — Revamped!

Calligraphy Workshop via Happy Hands Project

Hi everyone! I know it’s been a while since I wrote something about The Happy Hour workshops. The good news is, I’m writing about the revamped beginners’ workshops that I’ve started last 19th of  September.

The demand for the HHP workshops is still overwhelming, which made me think about the class size. The only way to bring in more participants is to find a bigger venue — and here in Singapore, that is not an easy task. Good thing was I attended the Googly Gooeys’ Watercolour Workshop, and there I found a perfect venue!

Calligraphy Workshop via Happy Hands Project

So the first part of the revamp is having the classes at The Untitled Space, a centrally-located, light-filled workshop space that doubles as a photography studio and occasional cafe. The class size is still small, but the space was able to accommodate slightly more participants. As always, the coffee is sooo good (and there’s Rooibos tea for non-caffeine drinkers!).

Calligraphy Workshop via Happy Hands Project

The second part, and the most important project I’ve ever worked on for the workshops, is the ‘Make Your Own Happy Hour’ workpad. It’s exclusive to participants, and has a new set of exemplar and practice strokes. The alphabet guide is based on Copperplate but still follows my own style of modern calligraphy. It has beautifully-lined pages for drills and freeplay which participants get to take home for more practice.

Calligraphy Workshop via Happy Hands Project

I’ve scheduled a couple more modern calligraphy for beginners workshops in October. You’ve been notified of the registration if you subscribed to the newsletter. Hope to see you in one of my classes soon!

All photos were taken by Jim Orca of The Untitled Space.

Ink Review: McCaffery’s Penman’s Ink in Black

McCaffery's Ink Review via Happy Hands Project

My first impression of this ink was, how come it’s so watery? I’ve always used sumi ink, which is a thicker, darker kind of black than this one. Sumi has the perfect viscosity in my opinion. So the first time I dipped my Nikko G into McCaffery’s, I was surprised that not much ink stayed in the reservoir.

I didn’t give up, of course. It wrote quite smoothly, but I found myself in another situation. The ink wasn’t black enough! How can this be penman’s black if it’s a weak grey? I waited for the ink to dry, and realised that the ink actually gets darker as it dries. Problem solved! It still has slight gradients just like walnut ink, specially on the downstrokes, but I liked the effect nonetheless.

McCaffery's Ink Review via Happy Hands Project

Another good thing about this ink is that it’s super smooth to write with. It behaves like Higgins Eternal, but with a ‘silky’ flow. It gives super fine hairlines that you won’t get with sumi ink. Though I wouldn’t recommend this for artwork that you will scan eventually (your scanner might not be able to catch the hairlines), it’s a lovely ink to write with. It gives your calligraphy some character, and it dries beautifully.

McCaffery's Ink Review via Happy Hands Project

The only downside is that you need to wash your nibs with water right after use — which was a bit difficult for me because I leave my nibs to dry for hours. McCaffery’s ink would eat your nibs, so make sure you wash it after use.

The verdict? Smooth, silky, deep grey ink, that gives my calligraphy some character. I would definitely recommend this ink.

Modern Calligraphy: Finding Your Own Style

Find Your Own Calligraphy Style via Happy Hands Project

There are so many reasons why many would opt for modern calligraphy over the traditional styles. First reason would most probably be because there are ‘no rules’ in the modern style. Another reason would be its popularity all over the web and social media platforms. Modern calligraphy is everywhere nowadays, and a lot of people are doing it as a hobby. Third reason, and this is the reason I believe the most, is because the modern style can reflect the writer’s personality. It would display one’s individuality, and you can have a style you can call your very own.

Before I go on, I’d like to dispel the myth that modern calligraphy simply has no rules. It’s a myth. It’s false. Modern pointed pen calligraphy is based on traditional Copperplate, so we will still follow the basic rules that come with it — consistent slant, legibility, and uniform thicks and thins. I would prefer to write something that is actually readable.

Now, for the fun part. With so many calligraphers and enthusiasts out there, how can you make your work stand out? It took me 2 years to come up with my own style — and I’m still learning, everyday. For beginners who want to display your individuality, I’ve come up with a few pointers.

1. Learn your basic letter forms.

Once you have memorized how each letter would look like, your calligraphy will look more consistent. Try to write the same letter in that style every time. Once you’ve mastered it, make slight variations to make it a little more exciting. Which leads me to my next point.

2. Write your own exemplar.

To help you memorize your basic letter forms, why don’t you write the full alphabet in the same style? You can always refer to it whenever you’re writing. You can write your variations there, too.

3. Study calligraphy fonts.

Modern calligraphy fonts are different from each other, and observe why this is so. Some have thick downstrokes, some are very upright, while some are playful and carefree. While doing this, you can also gauge what style reflects your personality more.

4. Keep on practicing.

Even the expert calligraphers out there still practice and do their drills. Believe me, it helps! It builds muscle memory, so you’ll be able to do your letter forms right. Practicing also keeps your mojo going, and very relaxing, too. I can write drills for hours. Just remember to have your own exemplar around while practicing so you can be consistent with your slant and style.

Find Your Own Calligraphy Style via Happy Hands Project

Finally having a style you can call your own will take months, or even years of practice. I must admit I tend to jump from every style I can think of when I was starting out. It’s not bad, and it actually helped me come up with the style that I would actually stick to eventually. Good luck in finding your own pointed pen style! Remember — Practice Makes Pretty!

Advanced Modern Calligraphy Workshop at library@orchard

The latest modern calligraphy class at the library@orchard is by far the BIGGEST group I’ve ever had. Wow. I’ll let you in on the scoop — I was invited to teach 2 workshops at the Library, and I was given this spacious learning venue they call ‘Make’, with floor to ceiling windows and glass walls. Both classes were sold out, which means more people are interested to try their hand at this craft which I fell in love with so many years ago. library@orchard is by far my favourite library in Singapore since it opened, because it’s great for creatives and makers and they got loads of interesting events every month.

Advanced Modern Calligraphy Workshop via Happy Hands Project

Well, glass walls also meant passers-by can have a preview of what’s going on in the class. As with my former Advanced Class, we mixed our own pots of gouache — first with a dark-coloured paint, then with white. Watching the participants write calligraphy with white ink on black is always amazing, because each one has a different style, and it’s always a sight to see! We ended the 3-hour workshop writing a short quote on black card stock.

Look at that group shot! I told you our group was huge.

Advanced Modern Calligraphy Workshop via Happy Hands Project

As always, I’m super happy to see familiar faces who have been to my previous beginners’ or hand-lettering classes. Hoping to back at the Library for a workshop again, and I don’t mind being a student this time. As always, thanks to everyone who came and it’s always a pleasure to share the art of calligraphy to everyone.

5 Tips: Is It Time To Replace My Calligraphy Nib?

Tips On When To Replace Nibs via Happy Hands Project

I’ve encountered this question a lot of times, and for beginners, it can be quite tricky. Some have asked me how long a pointed flex nib typically lasts. However, this question can’t be answered precisely — it would depend on how often a nib is used, or how much writing one has done with it.

There are some nibs in my stash that I only use from time to time, so therefore they have a longer life span. I have favourite ones, and I replace them more often. The key indication of a nib that needs to be chucked is when it starts ‘misbehaving’ (yup, sometimes I treat them like they’re my kids). Here I broke it down to 5 signs:

1. The nib is snagging the paper

This works specially when you’re used to how a certain nib behaves. Most often than not, I use a Nikko G, and I know that it glides onto my paper and doesn’t give me a hard time. When all of a sudden the tip starts scratching the surface of the paper during upstrokes, I know it needs to be replaced.

2. The upstrokes start skipping

Oh, that occasional ink splatter still catches me by surprise. Sometimes, I might be using a different kind of paper. But a splatter of ink on an upstroke? On my Rhodia?? That is totally unheard of. I would probably write a few more lines and see if the ink continues to skip and/or splatter. If it continues, the best thing to do is start again using a freshly prepared nib. Trust me, it works.

3. The ink flow is somehow different

If the ink just stays on the reservoir (that tiny hole in your nib that holds the nik) and wouldn’t flow, it can mean a few things. The ink may be too thick (or old, even), your nib needs washing, or it needs to be thrown into the bin. Combine this indication with any of the 2 above, and it means a new nib is the way to go.

4. The pointed tip is deformed

I had a Brause EF66 once, and it used to be my favourite nib. I used it all the time. Sadly, it was the last piece I had and obviously, I was holding on to it for as long is humanly possible. It did all those things above but I turned a blind eye. When I couldn’t take it anymore and my writing was a mess anyway, I took a closer look at the tip and realized that the tines were misaligned. The tines are the two parts of the nib that separates on the downstroke. Sometimes, it can still be repaired. I’d say retire the nib and use a new one.

5. The nib has rusted
Well, I have to say I’ve used some nibs that have slightly rusted and they still worked well. Given Singapore’s humidity, nibs always have this risk of rusting. I’d recommend placing packs of silica gel in your nib boxes. Slight rusting on the nib that is far from the tip is fine, but if the tips are corroding, it needs to be retired.

There you go! I hope these tips have given insight to this issue of nib replacement. If you have any other tips just let me know in the comments and I’ll update this post to add it!

Font Fancy: Besom + Free Watercolour Printable

So I’m sure you all know that brush lettering is like a craze right now, and a lot of brush lettering fonts are popping up for sale. I’ve been looking for a high-quality free font to share here on the blog, and I’ve been looking for a long time! Finally (drum roll please)… I finally found Besom!

Take Chances Printable via Happy Hands Project

I love how the brush strokes look so natural, yet still readable. Look at the tips of those letters! It looks like it was written with a dry brush. The problem with some fonts out there is that some of them are quite difficult to read — and that’s one of the most important characteristic that I’m looking for.

This is definitely a steal, as we’re all paying zilch for personal use. You can find it in use on these posters if my description doesn’t convince you enough. Go get your font here, and that A4 printable up there that I’ve designed here. Print it on a 300gsm textured card and you’ll have a pretty realistic-looking watercolour artwork ready to be frames.

Much love, you guys!

Free Brush Lettering Photoshop Brushes

Brush Lettering Photoshop Brushes via Happy Hands Project

I’m back with free Photoshop brushes! The last time I gave away some was 2 years ago, I cannot believe this. This is a fun brush lettering  set that you can use for note cards and greeting cards. I saved it in a very raw setting — meaning it’s organic, and the different colour hues have been retained for a realistic hand-lettered look.

Here’s a quick way to load your Photoshop brushes. According to this tutorial :

Put the brush presets you have downloaded into the folder Photoshop\Presets\Brushes in the Adobe folder in Program Files if you use Windows or in Applications if you use Macintosh. The original brush presets that come with Adobe Photoshop are kept in this folder. The brush presets should have an .abr ending.

When you open a new file in Photoshop, select the brush tool and you will be able to view the new brushes from the fly-out panel. Just a tip on using these lettering brushes — the opacity is a bit light. One click of the brush and you’ll get a pretty translucent effect. If you want a richer, bolder colour, click 2-3 times to reach 100% opacity. That’s what I did in the sample above.

Download your brush lettering pack here and start creating! Looking for calligraphy brushes to add to your collection? The ‘hello’ set can be downloaded here.