8 LETTERING ARTISTS TO FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

Instagram has been an important part of my journey in calligraphy and lettering. I’d say I’m quite a visual person — I get inspired by the things I see. The lettering and calligraphy community on Insta is like one big happy family, and when one is stuck in a rut, there’s always someone out there who’s ready to help. I’ve personally met some really inspiring people over there (if you’re reading this, hi!) and it was awesome.

For those of you looking for inspiration on social media, look no further. Here, I’ve compiled 8 up-and-coming lettering artists from different parts of the globe to inspire the handlettering lover in you!

Indonesia
@anggiivee

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

Spain
@gartz_

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

Russia
@oh_letters

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

Australia
@letterhstudio

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

USA
@jaekimdesigns

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

USA
@artbyhal

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

elarus
@dimaphew

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

United Kingdom
@yourgrayce

Lettering Artist to Follow on Instagram via Happy Hands Project

6 Brush Pens For Lettering Beginners

Brush Pens For Beginners via Happy Hands Project

Are you just starting to hand-letter using a brush pen? Or are you interested in creating brush lettering pieces but don’t know where to start? Well, I’ve been there. About 3 years ago I wanted to hand-letter using a brush but was totally lost. I tried using a small brush and some paint but found it extremely tough.

After some research, I stumbled upon the first ever brush pen in my collection — the Tombow Dual Brush. Oh, I didn’t traipse into brush lettering wonderland right then, but it was a good start. For beginners in brush lettering, let me share with you 6 brush pens that you can start with. My advise is try 1 or 2 of these and practice, practice, practice. You’ll get better I promise!

Kuretake via Happy Hands Project

Kuretake Fudebiyori Pocket Color Brush Pens

I love this pen. If I will be asked to bring just one tool for lettering, this is what I will most likely bring. This nifty brush pen has the perfect bristles for lettering and will give you a good variation of thick and thin strokes. I say it’s perfect because there are brush pens that are either too soft or too stiff, but the Kuretake pen has just the right flexibility.

Tombow via Happy Hands Project

Tombow Dual Brush Pen

Aah, the pen that started it all. For me, at least. The Tombow dual brush has a great tip and is slightly softer than the Kuretake. As the name suggests, each pen has a brush tip on one end and a fine tip on the opposite end. Some letterers use this pen for blending with other colours and they work great. The ink colours are a little less saturated and will not be so vibrant especially when used on coated paper, but I don’t mind this one bit because these are really great for practice and these pens have served me well during my learning journey in brush lettering.

Pentel Touch via Happy Hands Project

Pentel Fude Touch Sign Pen

The Pentel Touch has a small brush tip, and is pretty stiff. It’s great for writing small letters and is easy to use. It won’t give you drastic line variations like the first 2 pens mentioned above because if its small brush tip but if you want to practice writing small letters and strokes, this works great. It’s a small pen that can fit in your pocket, and has bright colours to choose from.

Copic Ciao via Happy Hands Project

Copic Ciao Marker

Honestly? The Copic Ciao marker is on this list mainly because of its availability here in Singapore — Art Friend has a bazillion colours of the Copic Ciao that it’s so difficult to walk away with just one. It has a thick body which gives the writer a good grip. The brush tip is on one end and a broad edge tip is on the other end. It has great colours as well, and is refillable! That’s awesome, don’t you think?

Lyra Aqua Duo via Happy Hands Project

Lyra Aqua Brush Duo

This pen is very much similar to the Tombow with a slightly smaller brush tip. This will give you good line variation, and it also has 2 tips — one with a brush and another with a fine tip. Here’s the first time I tried it, and I fell in love with it instantly! It’s very comfortable to write with and I highly recommend this for beginners.

Pentel Aquash via Happy Hands Project

Pentel Aquash Waterbrush

Now this one’s different from the rest, and slightly more challenging to use than the rest of the pens on this list. The water brush from Pentel is super convenient to use, has lettering-friendly bristles, and is lightweight. This practically replaces your jar of water when doing watercolour lettering or painting because the water will be in the pen itself, and you just give the pen a little squeeze to make the water come out. Talk about convenience! The Aquash also has a variety of brush sizes, and my favourite is the fine tip. It gives me a lot of flexibility and lets me blend colours nicely so obviously, that one’s my absolute favourite.

Where to Buy in Singapore?

Tombow Dual Brush: Overjoyed | Pentel Touch: Tokyu Hands | Copic Ciao: Art Friend | Lyra Aqua Brush: Overjoyed | Pentel Aquash: Art Friend

Unfortunately I haven’t seen the Kuretake Fudebiyori pen in any of the shops here in Singapore, but Overjoyed has several kinds worth checking out as well.

So there you have it, 6 brush pens that beginners in lettering can try. I know I’ve left out some pens that are really popular to letterers, but I guess some of those pens don’t really work for me. Do you have a favourite brush pen? Lemme know in the comments!

LETTERING LOGO: LAMB CUPCAKERY

Lamb Cupcakery Logo via Happy Hands Project
I always love doing lettering for company logos, and this hand-lettered logo for Lamb Cupcakery here in Singapore is one of those. Lamb was moving to a new location at the time, and will be having a branding overhaul. It included the logo, storefront signage, in-store signages, and menu.
Lamb Cupcakery Logo via Happy Hands Project

 

I designed a few versions, some with foliage and florals, some with flourishes and swirls. Finally, we settled on a pretty yet uncomplicated brush lettering style that’s as delicious-looking as the cupcakes they make. I mean, seriously, don’t these little babies look so scrumptious? My heavily pregnant self is craving for some right now.

Lamb Cupcakery Logo via Happy Hands Project 

Lamb Cupcakery Logo via Happy Hands Project 

Do swing by Lamb Cupcakery for that sugar fix:
8A Marina Boulevard
#B2-61 Marina Bay Link Mall
Singapore 018984

All photos were taken from Lamb’s Facebook page.

Doing What You Love: Focusing on Goals Under Stress

Focus On Your Goals | Lettering via Happy Hands Project

For me this year, the peak season for wedding calligraphy started on the later part of the 3rd quarter. I was on my first trimester of pregnancy at the time, and I was feeling extra emotional and tired. After tucking my daughter to sleep, I couldn’t get myself to work some more. I thought, how will I get through the wedding season if I was tired all the time? I was worried, but sleep always got the better of me. I hit the sack a couple of hours earlier than usual.

Then I worry again the next day because of the work that has been piling up.

Calligraphy and lettering is something I do because I love doing it. I like writing, and drawing letters, ever since I was a little girl. So why is this whole thing, the thing I’m supposed to love, is stressing me out? Now that I’m well into my second trimester and down to my last calligraphy addressing project for the year, I’m feeling much better and excited for what the coming year has to bring. I was able to accomplish the invitation suites for December weddings (and even one for March!), delivered place cards right on time, and also had a few large-sized calligraphy done for some clients. Let me share with you some of the things that kept me motivated — and sane — during the time when the work load was almost too much to handle.

FOCUS ON YOUR GOALS
I was able to do this by listing my goals down on paper. Seeing it on my wall makes it more ‘real’, and I was able to focus on my priorities instead of procrastinating and doing less important things. Focus on your daily or weekly goals and stick to it.

TAKE BREAKS
So yes, it’s important to get work done, but you’re headed for burn out if you don’t take a breather once in a while. There was a 250-word poem that I had to rewrite 3 times because of some silly mistakes I’ve made and it was frustrating! There was one evening when everything seemed to go wrong. I knocked my ink over, the envelope drying rack tumbled, and my hand was shaky. Why not take a break? Making watercolour washes on my pad relaxes me, and scribbling with my brush pens calms me down. Trust me, it works. By the time I got back to writing, it was so much better.

CHECK YOUR WORK
I’m lucky to have a husband who designs as well, and was willing to give his creative input into my work. Having another pair of eyes look through your finished work is better because he/she may see things differently than you do. Having someone else proofread is also a good idea. However, some of us would prefer to do things on our own and if this is the case, carefully check your work before sending it out. It saves time because you don’t have to do things over again, and you’ll have happy clients all the way.

ACCEPT YOUR LIMITATIONS
I had to give up some calligraphy workshops during this period. As much as I love to teach this craft, and I get emails asking when my next class would be, I knew I couldn’t handle it. Take a step back and see how your work load is, and learn to say no if you simply cannot handle any more. Your clients will thank you because you’ll be able to churn out better work.

REMEMBER WHY YOU’RE DOING THIS IN THE FIRST PLACE
When work gets too much for you to handle, pause and ask yourself why you’re working so hard for this anyway. I pick up my pen and dip it in ink and get lost in pointed pen bliss because it makes me happy. I’m passionate about this craft, and I want to share the beauty of calligraphy. What makes you do what you do? Think about it, and it’ll put a smile on your lips. Now check your daily goals and focus on them because believe me, it feels pretty good to get some work done.

Good luck and enjoy the ride!

5 Premium Brush Fonts Worth Checking Out

 

5-Brush-Lettering-Fonts-via-Happy-Hands-Project

Am I the only one hooked on brush lettering fonts? Everytime I click on Creative Market, there is a vast number of brush fonts for sale. For those who find lettering with a brush a bit challenging, one can always invest in a font or two to make artworks.

After pointed pen calligraphy, I also love lettering with a brush and trying out different styles can be tricky. For the beginner, looking at the structure and letter forms of these fonts can help one understand how these are written. These fonts are so natural-looking and you can even see the strokes on the letters. Talk about organic!

Wish I could give away a font that I have designed myself. But while I figure out how that dream will come to fruition, let me share with you my favourite premium brush fonts so far:

Bonjour by Nicky Laatz
Botanica Script by My Creative Land
Heartwell Italic by Flavor Type
Manhattan Darling by Make Media Co.
Smitten by Make Media Co.

Enjoy!

Lettering Without Thinking: Part II

Last year I wrote something called Lettering Without Thinking. With all the calligraphy commission works I’ve been doing lately, I didn’t have much time to use my brushes and just play with them. With calligraphy, I’m always concerned about legibility and balance, and whether the thickness of my strokes are consistent. I do play around with my pointed pen, but it’s not as carefree as no-nonsense writing with a brush.

Brush Lettering via Happy Hands Project

Let me share with you a couple of pieces I’ve done a week ago, using a round #8 brush and black Ecoline watercolour. The only thing I wanted to do here is to centralise all the words, write them big and small, make a mess, and have fun. And I was able to do all those — I just made sure I had a lot of paper that’s ready to use. I didn’t do these all in one go! I did a few different styles and chose these two as my favourites.

Brush Lettering via Happy Hands Project

Here are a few suggestions on how to experiment. You’ll get different results every time!

  • Try different brushes
  • Use watercolours, and don’t wash your brush when changing colours
  • Tear your papers’ edges for a rustic look
  • Splatter some ink when you’re done, just resist the urge to overdo it!
  • Don’t think — just go crazy!

Have fun lettering, everyone!

Brush Lettering via Happy Hands Project

Hand-Lettering Workshop In Singapore

 

I never knew that preparing for a workshop on hand lettering would be this fun. In collaboration with The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf Singapore, this class has been months in the making (we actually started planning in 2014!). This workshop is in conjunction with SG50, Singapore’s 50th anniversary of independence.

Coffee Bean Singapore Lettering Workshop via Happy Hands Project

We started with lettering exercises, with worksheets that I designed myself. There were also hand-lettered cheat sheets and prints that they got to bring home, on top of the markers and goodie bags from Coffee Bean. Each participant was to design a piece as an entry to Coffee Bean’s SG50 card design contest.

Coffee Bean Singapore Lettering Workshop via Happy Hands Project

We had a wonderful combination of coffee, pastry, conversations and laughter — apart from the actual lettering, of course. It was an awesome way to spend a Saturday morning!

Coffee Bean Singapore Lettering Workshop via Happy Hands Project

 

Head over to the Coffee Bean’s Facebook page to see more photos, and who knows, they might have more activities in store for us in the near future.

Coffee Bean Singapore Lettering Workshop via Happy Hands Project

Coffee Bean Singapore Lettering Workshop via Happy Hands ProjectThe video and all photos are courtesy of The Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf Singapore.

 

 

Lettering With Sharpies

Lettering With Sharpies via Happy Hands Project

I’ve been using selected colours of Sharpies in the past few years. Aside from black which I use almost every time I do script lettering for commission works, I also have silver, gold and bronze. As a graphic designer, I create all my lettering in black then colour them in my trusty laptop.

Everything totally changed last week when I received a full set of Sharpies for a class I will be teaching in a couple of weeks. I wanted to test the tools and see if the markers will work well with the paper. I made my sketch in pencil and started filling it with colour… and I was hooked! I just realised that it’s actually fun to go totally traditional and colour my artwork on paper.

I mean seriously, why would we rely on the computer when it’s all the more fun to fill in the colours by hand? I was thinking about why I didn’t do this before, and I could only think of a couple of things — first, colouring it in Illustrator is more convenient. I can do and redo as I please. Command Z. Trusty shortcuts. The works. Second, I wasn’t confident that I’ll be able to nail the colours in one go. There’s no ‘undo’ in the analog world. If I’m not pleased with my work in the end, there’s no other choice but to crumple the paper and do the whole thing all over again.

Well, obviously my lettering still needs a lot of improvement, but I’m quite happy that I did it anyway. I guess it never hurts to try a new tool, and if it doesn’t work the way you expected it to, don’t give up! I’ll probably be opening a Beginners’ Lettering Class here in Singapore in the near future so if you’re on this island, email me if you’re interested! In the meantime, here are a few more Sharpie DIYs around the web that I think might be fun to try:

  • If addressing envelopes in calligraphy seem intimidating for a beginner, here’s a way to use Sharpies instead. So pretty!
  • For coffee lovers like me (who can’t get enough of mugs), this is a fun DIY to try.
  • I’m in love with these black journals with gold Sharpie lettering! Gold on black never goes out of style, even if it’s not Christmas.

Have fun lettering with colours! xo